×
Napster App for
Rhapsody International Inc.
Inherent Vice (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) by Jonny Greenwood

Album

Inherent Vice (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Jonny Greenwood

Play on Napster

Album

Inherent Vice (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Jonny Greenwood

Play on Napster
Released:
Label: Nonesuch
There's less unity to this score than there was to Greenwood's work on Paul Thomas Anderson's previous films (There Will Be Blood and The Master). But that makes sense, given that the director's source material, on this occasion, is a Thomas Pynchon novel. So the grab-bag that's called for includes noir-ish cues ("Shasta"), indie-pop-adjacent arrangements ("Spooks") and vintage folk (Neil Young's "Journey Through the Past"). And since post-minimalism dies hard, Greenwood manages to sneak toothy orchestral textures into "The Chryskylodon Institute" and some electro-style into "Adrian Prussia."

About This Album

There's less unity to this score than there was to Greenwood's work on Paul Thomas Anderson's previous films (There Will Be Blood and The Master). But that makes sense, given that the director's source material, on this occasion, is a Thomas Pynchon novel. So the grab-bag that's called for includes noir-ish cues ("Shasta"), indie-pop-adjacent arrangements ("Spooks") and vintage folk (Neil Young's "Journey Through the Past"). And since post-minimalism dies hard, Greenwood manages to sneak toothy orchestral textures into "The Chryskylodon Institute" and some electro-style into "Adrian Prussia."

Songs

About This Album

There's less unity to this score than there was to Greenwood's work on Paul Thomas Anderson's previous films (There Will Be Blood and The Master). But that makes sense, given that the director's source material, on this occasion, is a Thomas Pynchon novel. So the grab-bag that's called for includes noir-ish cues ("Shasta"), indie-pop-adjacent arrangements ("Spooks") and vintage folk (Neil Young's "Journey Through the Past"). And since post-minimalism dies hard, Greenwood manages to sneak toothy orchestral textures into "The Chryskylodon Institute" and some electro-style into "Adrian Prussia."