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The Best of David Bowie 1980/1987 by David Bowie

Song

Let's Dance (Single Version) (2002 Digital Remaster)

David Bowie

Play on Napster

Song

Let's Dance (Single Version) (2002 Digital Remaster)

David Bowie

Play on Napster
Released:
Label: Parlophone UK
David Bowie began the 1980s on an artistic high with the brilliant Scary Monsters album, the creepy movie theme "Cat People" and the unstoppable Queen collaboration "Under Pressure." Then came his commercial rebirth, Let's Dance, an album which plays like a singles collection in itself. After that, the '80s get ugly for Bowie even though his '70s recordings pre-figure what happened in the decade. Thankfully, this set does such a good job of gleaning tracks both great ("Fashion," "Blue Jean," "China Girl") and good ("Absolute Beginners" and "Underground") that you'd be forgiven for thinking these were Bowie's artist golden years.

About This Album

David Bowie began the 1980s on an artistic high with the brilliant Scary Monsters album, the creepy movie theme "Cat People" and the unstoppable Queen collaboration "Under Pressure." Then came his commercial rebirth, Let's Dance, an album which plays like a singles collection in itself. After that, the '80s get ugly for Bowie even though his '70s recordings pre-figure what happened in the decade. Thankfully, this set does such a good job of gleaning tracks both great ("Fashion," "Blue Jean," "China Girl") and good ("Absolute Beginners" and "Underground") that you'd be forgiven for thinking these were Bowie's artist golden years.

Songs

About This Album

David Bowie began the 1980s on an artistic high with the brilliant Scary Monsters album, the creepy movie theme "Cat People" and the unstoppable Queen collaboration "Under Pressure." Then came his commercial rebirth, Let's Dance, an album which plays like a singles collection in itself. After that, the '80s get ugly for Bowie even though his '70s recordings pre-figure what happened in the decade. Thankfully, this set does such a good job of gleaning tracks both great ("Fashion," "Blue Jean," "China Girl") and good ("Absolute Beginners" and "Underground") that you'd be forgiven for thinking these were Bowie's artist golden years.