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About Treepeople

Treepeople were a gritty, melodic swatch of Post-Punk pop that flirted with a nascent Grunge phenomenon before breaking up in '94. Their heavy, repetitive rhythms, dual guitar interplay, and stop/start dynamics introduced the indie world to a younger Doug Martsch who would later form Built to Spill. Their loud, ultra-catchy tracks were filled with squealing distorted notes, rapid fire drumming and Doug Martsch's distinctive pleading vocals. The band made a final record after Martsch's decision to leave in '93, but it lacked the angular guitar work and songwriting dynamic of the earlier Treepeople releases.

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Listen toTreepeopleon Napster

Treepeople were a gritty, melodic swatch of Post-Punk pop that flirted with a nascent Grunge phenomenon before breaking up in '94. Their heavy, repetitive rhythms, dual guitar interplay, and stop/start dynamics introduced the indie world to a younger Doug Martsch who would later form Built to Spill. Their loud, ultra-catchy tracks were filled with squealing distorted notes, rapid fire drumming and Doug Martsch's distinctive pleading vocals. The band made a final record after Martsch's decision to leave in '93, but it lacked the angular guitar work and songwriting dynamic of the earlier Treepeople releases.

About Treepeople

Treepeople were a gritty, melodic swatch of Post-Punk pop that flirted with a nascent Grunge phenomenon before breaking up in '94. Their heavy, repetitive rhythms, dual guitar interplay, and stop/start dynamics introduced the indie world to a younger Doug Martsch who would later form Built to Spill. Their loud, ultra-catchy tracks were filled with squealing distorted notes, rapid fire drumming and Doug Martsch's distinctive pleading vocals. The band made a final record after Martsch's decision to leave in '93, but it lacked the angular guitar work and songwriting dynamic of the earlier Treepeople releases.

About Treepeople

Treepeople were a gritty, melodic swatch of Post-Punk pop that flirted with a nascent Grunge phenomenon before breaking up in '94. Their heavy, repetitive rhythms, dual guitar interplay, and stop/start dynamics introduced the indie world to a younger Doug Martsch who would later form Built to Spill. Their loud, ultra-catchy tracks were filled with squealing distorted notes, rapid fire drumming and Doug Martsch's distinctive pleading vocals. The band made a final record after Martsch's decision to leave in '93, but it lacked the angular guitar work and songwriting dynamic of the earlier Treepeople releases.