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Artist

Shonen Knife

About Shonen Knife

When Shonen Knife first appeared stateside in the late 80's/early '90s, no one could decide if they loved them because they played such pure Ramones-style Punk-Pop or because their bad English and pop culture fascination were so darn cute. The cute angle may have become a little tired after three records dedicated to Barbie, furry animals and Jonathan Richman, but the magnetic pull of charged guitar tunes harboring lethal hooks and sticky, confectioner's sugar vocals can still make a first-time listener repeatedly nod their head, a giddy smile plastered to their face.

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Shonen Knife

When Shonen Knife first appeared stateside in the late 80's/early '90s, no one could decide if they loved them because they played such pure Ramones-style Punk-Pop or because their bad English and pop culture fascination were so darn cute. The cute angle may have become a little tired after three records dedicated to Barbie, furry animals and Jonathan Richman, but the magnetic pull of charged guitar tunes harboring lethal hooks and sticky, confectioner's sugar vocals can still make a first-time listener repeatedly nod their head, a giddy smile plastered to their face.

About Shonen Knife

When Shonen Knife first appeared stateside in the late 80's/early '90s, no one could decide if they loved them because they played such pure Ramones-style Punk-Pop or because their bad English and pop culture fascination were so darn cute. The cute angle may have become a little tired after three records dedicated to Barbie, furry animals and Jonathan Richman, but the magnetic pull of charged guitar tunes harboring lethal hooks and sticky, confectioner's sugar vocals can still make a first-time listener repeatedly nod their head, a giddy smile plastered to their face.

Featured on Napster

500x500

Playlists

Japan Rocks

About Shonen Knife

When Shonen Knife first appeared stateside in the late 80's/early '90s, no one could decide if they loved them because they played such pure Ramones-style Punk-Pop or because their bad English and pop culture fascination were so darn cute. The cute angle may have become a little tired after three records dedicated to Barbie, furry animals and Jonathan Richman, but the magnetic pull of charged guitar tunes harboring lethal hooks and sticky, confectioner's sugar vocals can still make a first-time listener repeatedly nod their head, a giddy smile plastered to their face.

Featured on Napster

500x500

Playlists

Japan Rocks