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Muchacho

by Phosphorescent

Muchacho by Phosphorescent

Listen to

Muchacho

by Phosphorescent

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Released:
Label: Dead Oceans
After taking an extended sojourn through the American South with both To Willie (2009) and Here's to Taking It Easy (2010), Phosphorescent main man Matthew Houck returns with a more straightforward indie pop style. Muchacho opens with an electro-folk number ("Sun, Arise!") that sounds like Fleet Foxes meets My Morning Jacket. This gives way to "Song for Zula" and "Ride On/Right On," both of which possess a "new pop" vibe seemingly inspired by Springsteen's Tunnel of Love period. Towards album's end Houck proves he's not totally over country music with the gracefully swaying "Down to Go."

About This Album

After taking an extended sojourn through the American South with both To Willie (2009) and Here's to Taking It Easy (2010), Phosphorescent main man Matthew Houck returns with a more straightforward indie pop style. Muchacho opens with an electro-folk number ("Sun, Arise!") that sounds like Fleet Foxes meets My Morning Jacket. This gives way to "Song for Zula" and "Ride On/Right On," both of which possess a "new pop" vibe seemingly inspired by Springsteen's Tunnel of Love period. Towards album's end Houck proves he's not totally over country music with the gracefully swaying "Down to Go."

Songs

About This Album

After taking an extended sojourn through the American South with both To Willie (2009) and Here's to Taking It Easy (2010), Phosphorescent main man Matthew Houck returns with a more straightforward indie pop style. Muchacho opens with an electro-folk number ("Sun, Arise!") that sounds like Fleet Foxes meets My Morning Jacket. This gives way to "Song for Zula" and "Ride On/Right On," both of which possess a "new pop" vibe seemingly inspired by Springsteen's Tunnel of Love period. Towards album's end Houck proves he's not totally over country music with the gracefully swaying "Down to Go."