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The New Music - Penderecki, Stockhausen, Brown, Posseur by Members of The Rome Symphony Orchestra

Album

The New Music - Penderecki, Stockhausen, Brown, Posseur

Members of The Rome Symphony Orchestra

Play on Napster

Album

The New Music - Penderecki, Stockhausen, Brown, Posseur

Members of The Rome Symphony Orchestra

Play on Napster
Released:
Label: RCA Red Seal
This killer modern-music LP first came out in 1967, but was not digitally distributed until 2013. It's about time: pianist-composer Frederic Rzewski's take on the Stockhausen classic "Kontra-Punkte" is great to have back in the catalog. And though Kryzystof Penderecki's "Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima" is well known (in part thanks to Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood), the other pieces here -- by Earle Brown (the nutty "Available Forms I") and Henri Pousseur ("Rimes") -- are rarities. The performances are good for any era; taken together, they makes for a key mid-20th century sampler.

About This Album

This killer modern-music LP first came out in 1967, but was not digitally distributed until 2013. It's about time: pianist-composer Frederic Rzewski's take on the Stockhausen classic "Kontra-Punkte" is great to have back in the catalog. And though Kryzystof Penderecki's "Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima" is well known (in part thanks to Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood), the other pieces here -- by Earle Brown (the nutty "Available Forms I") and Henri Pousseur ("Rimes") -- are rarities. The performances are good for any era; taken together, they makes for a key mid-20th century sampler.

Songs

About This Album

This killer modern-music LP first came out in 1967, but was not digitally distributed until 2013. It's about time: pianist-composer Frederic Rzewski's take on the Stockhausen classic "Kontra-Punkte" is great to have back in the catalog. And though Kryzystof Penderecki's "Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima" is well known (in part thanks to Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood), the other pieces here -- by Earle Brown (the nutty "Available Forms I") and Henri Pousseur ("Rimes") -- are rarities. The performances are good for any era; taken together, they makes for a key mid-20th century sampler.