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Ives: Symphony No. 2; Symphony No. 3 "The Camp Meeting"; Leonard Bernstein discusses Charles Ives

by Leonard Bernstein

Ives: Symphony No. 2; Symphony No. 3 'The Camp Meeting'; Leonard Bernstein discusses Charles Ives by Leonard Bernstein

Listen to

Ives: Symphony No. 2; Symphony No. 3 "The Camp Meeting"; Leonard Bernstein discusses Charles Ives

by Leonard Bernstein

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Released:
Label: Sony Classical
Modern audiences are familiar with Bernstein's strengths as a conductor and composer, but aside from YouTube clips, access to Bernstein the educator (arguably the most significant role of his late career) is difficult to come by. The final track on this repackaged collection presents Bernstein talking with great eloquence about Charles Ives, America's "musical Mark Twain, Emerson and Lincoln all rolled into one." He also works through themes in the symphonies. While the interpretation of the music is sterling, the conversation is equally valuable.

About This Album

Modern audiences are familiar with Bernstein's strengths as a conductor and composer, but aside from YouTube clips, access to Bernstein the educator (arguably the most significant role of his late career) is difficult to come by. The final track on this repackaged collection presents Bernstein talking with great eloquence about Charles Ives, America's "musical Mark Twain, Emerson and Lincoln all rolled into one." He also works through themes in the symphonies. While the interpretation of the music is sterling, the conversation is equally valuable.

Songs

About This Album

Modern audiences are familiar with Bernstein's strengths as a conductor and composer, but aside from YouTube clips, access to Bernstein the educator (arguably the most significant role of his late career) is difficult to come by. The final track on this repackaged collection presents Bernstein talking with great eloquence about Charles Ives, America's "musical Mark Twain, Emerson and Lincoln all rolled into one." He also works through themes in the symphonies. While the interpretation of the music is sterling, the conversation is equally valuable.