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About Iggy Pop

By the late '60s, while other bands were thinking of covert ways to make LSD references in their songs, Iggy & the Stooges were playing primal, stripped-down garage rock 'n' roll. If their brash, raw music alienated the flower-power set, their live performances went even further to separate them from the mainstream. Onstage misdeeds -- mutilating himself with broken bottles, throwing up on the audience, attacking crowd members -- made Iggy Pop a notoriously destructive figure. By the time the band broke up in 1974, the Stooges had already recorded three excellent albums and a slew of perfect punk classics ("1969," "I Wanna Be Your Dog," and "Search and Destroy," among others). Pop embarked on a solo career that has had its share of highs and lows, though it yielded the brilliant David Bowie-produced albums The Idiot and Lust for Life. And, thankfully, his onstage antics are now only slightly less destructive and obnoxious than 30 years ago.

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Listen toIggy Popon Napster

By the late '60s, while other bands were thinking of covert ways to make LSD references in their songs, Iggy & the Stooges were playing primal, stripped-down garage rock 'n' roll. If their brash, raw music alienated the flower-power set, their live performances went even further to separate them from the mainstream. Onstage misdeeds -- mutilating himself with broken bottles, throwing up on the audience, attacking crowd members -- made Iggy Pop a notoriously destructive figure. By the time the band broke up in 1974, the Stooges had already recorded three excellent albums and a slew of perfect punk classics ("1969," "I Wanna Be Your Dog," and "Search and Destroy," among others). Pop embarked on a solo career that has had its share of highs and lows, though it yielded the brilliant David Bowie-produced albums The Idiot and Lust for Life. And, thankfully, his onstage antics are now only slightly less destructive and obnoxious than 30 years ago.

About Iggy Pop

By the late '60s, while other bands were thinking of covert ways to make LSD references in their songs, Iggy & the Stooges were playing primal, stripped-down garage rock 'n' roll. If their brash, raw music alienated the flower-power set, their live performances went even further to separate them from the mainstream. Onstage misdeeds -- mutilating himself with broken bottles, throwing up on the audience, attacking crowd members -- made Iggy Pop a notoriously destructive figure. By the time the band broke up in 1974, the Stooges had already recorded three excellent albums and a slew of perfect punk classics ("1969," "I Wanna Be Your Dog," and "Search and Destroy," among others). Pop embarked on a solo career that has had its share of highs and lows, though it yielded the brilliant David Bowie-produced albums The Idiot and Lust for Life. And, thankfully, his onstage antics are now only slightly less destructive and obnoxious than 30 years ago.

About Iggy Pop

By the late '60s, while other bands were thinking of covert ways to make LSD references in their songs, Iggy & the Stooges were playing primal, stripped-down garage rock 'n' roll. If their brash, raw music alienated the flower-power set, their live performances went even further to separate them from the mainstream. Onstage misdeeds -- mutilating himself with broken bottles, throwing up on the audience, attacking crowd members -- made Iggy Pop a notoriously destructive figure. By the time the band broke up in 1974, the Stooges had already recorded three excellent albums and a slew of perfect punk classics ("1969," "I Wanna Be Your Dog," and "Search and Destroy," among others). Pop embarked on a solo career that has had its share of highs and lows, though it yielded the brilliant David Bowie-produced albums The Idiot and Lust for Life. And, thankfully, his onstage antics are now only slightly less destructive and obnoxious than 30 years ago.