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Through The Devil Softly

by Hope Sandoval and the Warm Inventions

Through The Devil Softly by Hope Sandoval and the Warm Inventions

Listen to

Through The Devil Softly

by Hope Sandoval and the Warm Inventions

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Released:
Label: Nettwerk Records
The drowsy mysticism that rendered Hope Sandoval's work with Mazzy Star infinitely distinctive, casts its magic spell on opening cut "Blanchard." That doesn't necessarily mean the rest of this second installment of post-Mazzy Star Sandoval music is not worth listening to. It just means there's now more to play after "Halah" and "Fade Into You." "Trouble" is another one where Sandoval's undeniably cool vocal persona (read: is she cotton-y smooth or, uh, oxy-cotton-y smooth?) transcends gimmickry and appropriately pushes the East L.A.-born singer into true auteur territory.

About This Album

The drowsy mysticism that rendered Hope Sandoval's work with Mazzy Star infinitely distinctive, casts its magic spell on opening cut "Blanchard." That doesn't necessarily mean the rest of this second installment of post-Mazzy Star Sandoval music is not worth listening to. It just means there's now more to play after "Halah" and "Fade Into You." "Trouble" is another one where Sandoval's undeniably cool vocal persona (read: is she cotton-y smooth or, uh, oxy-cotton-y smooth?) transcends gimmickry and appropriately pushes the East L.A.-born singer into true auteur territory.

Songs

About This Album

The drowsy mysticism that rendered Hope Sandoval's work with Mazzy Star infinitely distinctive, casts its magic spell on opening cut "Blanchard." That doesn't necessarily mean the rest of this second installment of post-Mazzy Star Sandoval music is not worth listening to. It just means there's now more to play after "Halah" and "Fade Into You." "Trouble" is another one where Sandoval's undeniably cool vocal persona (read: is she cotton-y smooth or, uh, oxy-cotton-y smooth?) transcends gimmickry and appropriately pushes the East L.A.-born singer into true auteur territory.