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What If We

by Brandon Heath

What If We by Brandon Heath

Listen to

What If We

by Brandon Heath

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Released:
Label: Reunion Records
Bandon Heath’s sophomore album is hung on the hook of its first track, “Give Me Your Eyes” which takes the mood of “If We Are the Body” (Casting Crowns) or “99” (Audio Adrenaline) and adds Mat Kearney radio appeal. Heath tends to hit one true hook per album then take it easy for the rest of the set such as “I’m Not Who I Was” on his debut. Similarly here, the 10 tracks that follow “Give Me…” never quite hit that same mark but reach other amiable heights such as establishing Heath as a stable songwriter with the sentimental storytelling nature of Chris Rice or Mark Shultz and a bit of Tom Higgenson vocals (Plain White T’s). It’s enough to carry a sophomore album but with little indication of what ultimate identity.

About This Album

Bandon Heath’s sophomore album is hung on the hook of its first track, “Give Me Your Eyes” which takes the mood of “If We Are the Body” (Casting Crowns) or “99” (Audio Adrenaline) and adds Mat Kearney radio appeal. Heath tends to hit one true hook per album then take it easy for the rest of the set such as “I’m Not Who I Was” on his debut. Similarly here, the 10 tracks that follow “Give Me…” never quite hit that same mark but reach other amiable heights such as establishing Heath as a stable songwriter with the sentimental storytelling nature of Chris Rice or Mark Shultz and a bit of Tom Higgenson vocals (Plain White T’s). It’s enough to carry a sophomore album but with little indication of what ultimate identity.

Songs

About This Album

Bandon Heath’s sophomore album is hung on the hook of its first track, “Give Me Your Eyes” which takes the mood of “If We Are the Body” (Casting Crowns) or “99” (Audio Adrenaline) and adds Mat Kearney radio appeal. Heath tends to hit one true hook per album then take it easy for the rest of the set such as “I’m Not Who I Was” on his debut. Similarly here, the 10 tracks that follow “Give Me…” never quite hit that same mark but reach other amiable heights such as establishing Heath as a stable songwriter with the sentimental storytelling nature of Chris Rice or Mark Shultz and a bit of Tom Higgenson vocals (Plain White T’s). It’s enough to carry a sophomore album but with little indication of what ultimate identity.