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Here by Alicia Keys

Album

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Released:
Label: RCA RECORDS LABEL
Alicia Keys’ first album in four years ago hearkens to her heartfelt and piano-based debut. There are few showy pop ballads, just Keys singing about self-worth, black identity, and social issues. On “Illusion of Bliss,” she takes on the bluesy voice of a woman struggling with poverty and drug addiction; for “She Don’t Really Care,” she remembers her years growing up in New York. On “Blended Family,” she reprises the chords from Edie Brickell’s “What I Am” to address the children of the man she’s married to (in this case, producer Swizz Beats), and sings, “Everything is alright with me and your mama/Everybody here you know adores ya.” In a year when socially conscious urban music has surged to the forefront, the emotionally sincere tones of Here should fit right in.

About This Album

Alicia Keys’ first album in four years ago hearkens to her heartfelt and piano-based debut. There are few showy pop ballads, just Keys singing about self-worth, black identity, and social issues. On “Illusion of Bliss,” she takes on the bluesy voice of a woman struggling with poverty and drug addiction; for “She Don’t Really Care,” she remembers her years growing up in New York. On “Blended Family,” she reprises the chords from Edie Brickell’s “What I Am” to address the children of the man she’s married to (in this case, producer Swizz Beats), and sings, “Everything is alright with me and your mama/Everybody here you know adores ya.” In a year when socially conscious urban music has surged to the forefront, the emotionally sincere tones of Here should fit right in.

Songs

About This Album

Alicia Keys’ first album in four years ago hearkens to her heartfelt and piano-based debut. There are few showy pop ballads, just Keys singing about self-worth, black identity, and social issues. On “Illusion of Bliss,” she takes on the bluesy voice of a woman struggling with poverty and drug addiction; for “She Don’t Really Care,” she remembers her years growing up in New York. On “Blended Family,” she reprises the chords from Edie Brickell’s “What I Am” to address the children of the man she’s married to (in this case, producer Swizz Beats), and sings, “Everything is alright with me and your mama/Everybody here you know adores ya.” In a year when socially conscious urban music has surged to the forefront, the emotionally sincere tones of Here should fit right in.