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American Worker by The Bus Boys

Album

American Worker

The Bus Boys

Play on Napster

Album

American Worker

The Bus Boys

Play on Napster
Released:
Label: Legacy Recordings
Though often said to have sold out from their debut's Louis Jordan-styled funny bone new wave to straighter-faced corporate rock, the only time this all-black L.A. band's 1982 album hints at proto-Living Colour heaviness are the excellent "Yellow Lights" and "I Get Lost." Otherwise, there's some surf satire, corny protest reggae, a Reagan-recession-era working-for-the-weekend title track, and stabs at Tommy Tutone/early-Huey Lewis-type pseudo-wave -- notably the Chin/Chapman-written "Heart and Soul," which Exile had taken to No. 103 the year before and Huey himself took to No. 8 a year later.

About This Album

Though often said to have sold out from their debut's Louis Jordan-styled funny bone new wave to straighter-faced corporate rock, the only time this all-black L.A. band's 1982 album hints at proto-Living Colour heaviness are the excellent "Yellow Lights" and "I Get Lost." Otherwise, there's some surf satire, corny protest reggae, a Reagan-recession-era working-for-the-weekend title track, and stabs at Tommy Tutone/early-Huey Lewis-type pseudo-wave -- notably the Chin/Chapman-written "Heart and Soul," which Exile had taken to No. 103 the year before and Huey himself took to No. 8 a year later.

Songs

About This Album

Though often said to have sold out from their debut's Louis Jordan-styled funny bone new wave to straighter-faced corporate rock, the only time this all-black L.A. band's 1982 album hints at proto-Living Colour heaviness are the excellent "Yellow Lights" and "I Get Lost." Otherwise, there's some surf satire, corny protest reggae, a Reagan-recession-era working-for-the-weekend title track, and stabs at Tommy Tutone/early-Huey Lewis-type pseudo-wave -- notably the Chin/Chapman-written "Heart and Soul," which Exile had taken to No. 103 the year before and Huey himself took to No. 8 a year later.