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Flesh + Blood by The John Butler Trio

Album

Flesh + Blood

The John Butler Trio

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Released:
Label: VANGUARD (VAN)
As with many jam-centric artists (from Dave Matthews to Widespread Panic), John Butler's studio output tends to be significantly more crafted and mannered than his fiery live performances. Flesh + Blood, the Aussie's sixth album, is no exception to the rule. The record, possibly the most confident of Butler's career, opens with two of its best tunes: "Spring to Come" (dig the intricate fingerpicking) and the fuzzed out "Livin' in the City" (imagine G. Love fronting The Black Keys). Later on, Butler eases into "Wings Are Wide," a ballad striking for its soaring vocals and thumping percussion.

About This Album

As with many jam-centric artists (from Dave Matthews to Widespread Panic), John Butler's studio output tends to be significantly more crafted and mannered than his fiery live performances. Flesh + Blood, the Aussie's sixth album, is no exception to the rule. The record, possibly the most confident of Butler's career, opens with two of its best tunes: "Spring to Come" (dig the intricate fingerpicking) and the fuzzed out "Livin' in the City" (imagine G. Love fronting The Black Keys). Later on, Butler eases into "Wings Are Wide," a ballad striking for its soaring vocals and thumping percussion.

Songs

About This Album

As with many jam-centric artists (from Dave Matthews to Widespread Panic), John Butler's studio output tends to be significantly more crafted and mannered than his fiery live performances. Flesh + Blood, the Aussie's sixth album, is no exception to the rule. The record, possibly the most confident of Butler's career, opens with two of its best tunes: "Spring to Come" (dig the intricate fingerpicking) and the fuzzed out "Livin' in the City" (imagine G. Love fronting The Black Keys). Later on, Butler eases into "Wings Are Wide," a ballad striking for its soaring vocals and thumping percussion.