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Drive by Alan Jackson

Album

Drive

Alan Jackson

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Released:
Label: Arista Nashville
Released in January of 2002, Alan Jackson's Drive includes the gut-wrenching post-9/11 song "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)" -- one of the most poignant "of the people" songs ever written. Ever. Horrific as it was, 9/11 stands as the event that shaped this decade for Americans, and Jackson's larger-than-life expression of stunned helplessness encapsulated the American collective perfectly. But Drive also reaffirms family ("Drive [For Daddy Gene]"), working on relationships ("Work in Progress") and keeping a sunny outlook ("That'd Be Right") in a straightforward, often humorous way -- just the kind of salve a grieving nation needed.

About This Album

Released in January of 2002, Alan Jackson's Drive includes the gut-wrenching post-9/11 song "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)" -- one of the most poignant "of the people" songs ever written. Ever. Horrific as it was, 9/11 stands as the event that shaped this decade for Americans, and Jackson's larger-than-life expression of stunned helplessness encapsulated the American collective perfectly. But Drive also reaffirms family ("Drive [For Daddy Gene]"), working on relationships ("Work in Progress") and keeping a sunny outlook ("That'd Be Right") in a straightforward, often humorous way -- just the kind of salve a grieving nation needed.

Songs

About This Album

Released in January of 2002, Alan Jackson's Drive includes the gut-wrenching post-9/11 song "Where Were You (When the World Stopped Turning)" -- one of the most poignant "of the people" songs ever written. Ever. Horrific as it was, 9/11 stands as the event that shaped this decade for Americans, and Jackson's larger-than-life expression of stunned helplessness encapsulated the American collective perfectly. But Drive also reaffirms family ("Drive [For Daddy Gene]"), working on relationships ("Work in Progress") and keeping a sunny outlook ("That'd Be Right") in a straightforward, often humorous way -- just the kind of salve a grieving nation needed.